Hillel Gallery Project

About HGP                                                                                                                                                               

Hillel Gallery Project is a student run Gallery that curates and selects exhibits by Brown and RISD students and both local and international professional artists. Our committee is made up of undergraduate and graduate students of all disciplines and backgrounds. 

  
The Gallery is located at:
Brown/RISD Hillel
80 Brown Street
Providence, RI
Building hours and information

For updates on events and exhibition opportunities email us at gallery@brownrisdhillel.org and ask to join the mailing list.

Current and Past Exhibits

"Empowering A Generation": Photo Essay by Liza Yeager '17

Started by Scott Warren ’09, Generation Citizen has become a new movement in American civics education. The organization is based on a semester-long curriculum designed to teach students in low-income schools to be engaged citizens. ​This year ​
Generation Citizen will reach 9,500 students in 380 classrooms ​in four ​cities, including Providence. See their work in action through a photographic essay created by Storyteller for Good Liza Yeager '17 through a program of the Swearer Center for Public Service. More stories of social change like Liza's are online at brown.edu/swearersparks.

In partnership with the Swearer Center for Public Service.
"Empowering A Generation": Photo Essay by Liza Yeager '17 Started by Scott Warren ’09, Generation Citizen has become a new movement in American civics education. The organization is based on a semester-long curriculum designed to teach students in low-income schools to be engaged citizens. ​This year ​ Generation Citizen will reach 9,500 students in 380 classrooms ​in four ​cities, including Providence. See their work in action through a photographic essay created by Storyteller for Good Liza Yeager '17 through a program of the Swearer Center for Public Service. More stories of social change like Liza's are online at brown.edu/swearersparks. In partnership with the Swearer Center for Public Service.

 

Shmattes (www.shmattes.org) is an exhibition project that explores the issue of cultural Jewish identity through t-shirts. These t-shirts have been acquired from all over the contemporary Jewish world-- eBay auctions, bat and bar mitzvahs, youth conferences, independent visual artists, among many other sources. The project's goal is to "track" through these t-shirts the ways in which individuals and institutions deal with the question of Jewish identity when that identity is not about religion. As t-shirts are cheap to make and sell and offer limitless design possibilities, these items provide an exceptionally good look at how people are creatively dealing with the question of Jewishness. Ultimately, Shmattes aims to provide a visual and tactile launch pad for conversations about cultural Jewish identity through the display of these t-shirts.

"Empowering A Generation": Photo Essay by Liza Yeager '17

Started by Scott Warren ’09, Generation Citizen has become a new movement in American civics education. The organization is based on a semester-long curriculum designed to teach students in low-income schools to be engaged citizens. ​This year ​
Generation Citizen will reach 9,500 students in 380 classrooms ​in four ​cities, including Providence. See their work in action through a photographic essay created by Storyteller for Good Liza Yeager '17 through a program of the Swearer Center for Public Service. More stories of social change like Liza's are online at brown.edu/swearersparks.

In partnership with the Swearer Center for Public Service.
"Empowering A Generation": Photo Essay by Liza Yeager '17

Started by Scott Warren ’09, Generation Citizen has become a new movement in American civics education. The organization is based on a semester-long curriculum designed to teach students in low-income schools to be engaged citizens. ​This year ​
Generation Citizen will reach 9,500 students in 380 classrooms ​in four ​cities, including Providence. See their work in action through a photographic essay created by Storyteller for Good Liza Yeager '17 through a program of the Swearer Center for Public Service. More stories of social change like Liza's are online at brown.edu/swearersparks.

In partnership with the Swearer Center for Public Service.


David Zwirner is pleased to present To do as one would, a group exhibition organized by gallery staff members Mary Mitsch, Martha Moldovan, and Poppy Pulitzer on view at the 519 West 19th Street space in New York.
 
To do as one would borrows its title from a statement on the principles of utility by British philosopher John Stuart Mill in his foundational text Utilitarianism (1863). The exhibition will present a group of artists who employ materials and imagery often associated with industrial production, construction sites, corporate environments, or commercial endeavors. Cement, office chairs, light bulbs, wire, cloth—objects that are typically the base of economic and governmental enterprises—are repurposed as art and, in turn, shed of their intended use-value.

David Zwirner is pleased to present To do as one would, a group exhibition organized by gallery staff members Mary Mitsch, Martha Moldovan, and Poppy Pulitzer on view at the 519 West 19th Street space in New York.
 
To do as one would borrows its title from a statement on the principles of utility by British philosopher John Stuart Mill in his foundational text Utilitarianism (1863). The exhibition will present a group of artists who employ materials and imagery often associated with industrial production, construction sites, corporate environments, or commercial endeavors. Cement, office chairs, light bulbs, wire, cloth—objects that are typically the base of economic and governmental enterprises—are repurposed as art and, in turn, shed of their intended use-value.
David Zwirner's "To do as one would", a group exhibition organized by gallery staff members Mary Mitsch, Martha Moldovan, and Poppy Pulitzer at the 519 West 19th Street space in New York. To do as one would borrows its title from a statement on the principles of utility by British philosopher John Stuart Mill in his foundational text Utilitarianism (1863). The exhibition will present a group of artists who employ materials and imagery often associated with industrial production, construction sites, corporate environments, or commercial endeavors. Cement, office chairs, light bulbs, wire, cloth—objects that are typically the base of economic and governmental enterprises—are repurposed as art and, in turn, shed of their intended use-value. For more information visit http://www.davidzwirner.com/exhibition/to-do-as-one-would/







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